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Recording Bass Guitar

“Jim- Whats the hardest thing to record?”

Recording Bass Guitar

For me its Recording Bass Guitar. The technique, the part, the bass, the amp (if needed) all play a huge part in making it sound like it’s part of the band. Usually there’s overplaying as the bassist is use to playing at rehearsals or live where they me be required to fill all the spaces. Typically I don’t want all the spaces filled in a Major recording. It’s simple things like don’t play over the snare some times or don’t clack on the pickups (more of a Metal thing).

When recording bass parts I typically use API mic pre’s along with an LA 3 compressor. These two items create a sonically intact front end bass signal. This enables the bass player and I to concentrate on getting the most grooving, underplayed non-clacking part possible.

An easy way to check your technique, provided you’re multi-tracking, is to get a copy of your bass part solo’ed so you can hear what your actually playing. You might be surprised at what doesn’t need to be there.

Of course there is the bass itself. It needs to sound right for what you’re doing. Clear and piano like or dead and muted depending on the genre. Other obvious things, make sure the strings are relatively new and the intonation is set correctly before you start recording…..hope this is helpful……… Jim

 
 

Recording Bass Guitar

Recording with or without effects

“Jim, Should I record with effects like reverb or delay on the track?”

recording-with-effectsAs a Music Producer and audio Engineer, this is another question I get frequently. Typically, the answer is no, but it comes down to personal taste.

Personally I record a lot of my guitar effects thru the guitar amp as if the player is performing live. Why? Because I LIKE THE SOUND of guitar effects thru the amp while the guitarist is cutting the track. “But Jim, then you cant change it”. Correct, but I LIKE IT…..so I have made a production decision.

That being said, my preference is to record vocals dry with no effects and adjust them later according to the mix. I do however record vocals with some level of compression. The amount of compression I use is dictated largely by the genre of music the track is for. Pop music is very compressed so I’ll use some compression while tracking and maybe a bit more when I mix. When recording and producing a Jazz record, I will use much less compression while tracking as this genre dictates that.

A lot of keyboards have built in fx. Again, If I like the sound, I’ll use it. If I don’t, I’ll have the player remove them.

When recording Bass guitar, I’ll usually take a direct line straight from the bass and maybe a line from the amp so I can add dirt or distortion if need be. Both of these will get a bit of limiting (high ratio Compression) and I will blend the two later.

When recording Drums, I rarely ever use delay or reverb while tracking. BUT I use a fair amount of compression on the overheads and rooms. Why? Because I love the sound of compressed drums. I will also put a bit of compression on the Snare and kick when tracking. You need to be very careful with this as snare compression can pull unwanted hi hat into the snare mic. We will pay very close attention to mic placement so we usually don’t run into the bleeding hat problem.

A lot of how I record is based on my opinions, preferences and experiences. Some engineer/producers prefer to do all effects/ compression at mix. I do a combination of both. The point is, if you love the effect or sound ….record it. You may not get a chance to get it back later.

Hope this helps, Jim

Recording with or without effects